Easter and Pentecost

  • The Ascension of Jesus is a strange story at first glance. Jesus is air-lifted into the heavens and we’re left with a collage of clouds and sunlight. To be clear, it is a strange story. And, when we look at this story in the context of all of Jesus’ other interactions, blessings, healings, miracles...it actually feels pretty consistent with what we've experienced of Jesus thus far. 


  • The Spirit, the water, always finds a way. No rock or log will stop it completely. It may change its course or alter its speed, but still the water and Spirit flow. May this be true for your spirit this week as well.


  • Paul believed that God longed to be known by us. As children of God, we see reflections, glimpses of the Divine in each other. In our connection and relationships--in community--we experience God more fully. This week, we explore our ability to stay connected, to form and sustain relationships--even from a distance--through a screen, or a letter, or a phone call.


  • In preparation for today’s meditation I read, “The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember.” And it was inspiring and nostalgic and I loved it. But I couldn’t really find a quote that felt “just right.” I was left with an overall feeling of wanting to name the real feelings, which Mr. Rogers talks about emphatically. 


  • Here is a simple meditation for today. Consider these questions in the simplest ways that you can.  Do not critique your answers; just allow them to come to your consciousness.  Tend to your soul’s most inner needs as a way of preparing to live your faith in new ways.


Instead of finding a sealed tomb, the women who had come at dawn on Sunday are surprised by an angel who announces astonishing news: "Jesus has been raised from the dead" (Matt. 28:7). The heavenly messenger invites the mourners to see the empty tomb and then go and tell the disciples that the Crucified One is alive!

The season from Easter to Pentecost is also called the Great Fifty Days, a tradition inspired by the Jewish season of fifty days between Passover and Shavuot—the feast celebrating the giving of the Torah to Moses.

The liturgical color for this season is celebratory White or Gold. When the season ends on Pentecost Sunday, White is replaced with Red. This color reminds the congregation of fire—the symbol of the Holy Spirit. On Pentecost the Holy Spirit overpowered the barriers of culture and race. The first Sunday after Pentecost celebrates the Trinity, and the color again is White or Gold.